Blog

What is Shot Blasting?

What is Shot Blasting?

 

Shot blasting is the process of propelling an abrasive shot via a shot blasting machine. This machine is either powered by compressed air or electrically driven using an extremely high-speed blast wheel. Shot blasting is used to remove surface contaminants in readiness for repainting, for instance on concrete or steel.  Although sometimes the process is used to give a textured finish,  for example, if an anti-slip surface is required,  or just to provide an aesthetic appearance to an ageing or uneven surface.

The term “shot blasting” is quite a generic or loosely used term within the industry to describe many forms of blast cleaning. This ranges from open sandblasting, grit, or shot blasting to enclosed (captive), dustless grit or shot blasting.

The Shot Blasting Process

Here at Blast Technology Limited, we provide a nationwide shot blasting service that includes various forms of open grit and sandblasting. Our core activity is the preparation of concrete floors and surfaces using an electrically powered shot blasting machine. This is coupled with a long flexible pipe to a large vacuum unit and uses a spherical steel shot as an abrasive. In operation, the machine traverses the floor in long, straight runs.  As it passes the steel shot or abrasive, it is propelled at high-speed against the surface. This removes the failed coating and other surface contaminants. The mixture of abrasive, paint particles and dust then recirculates inside the machine, where the steel shot is continually reused, but the paint particles and dust are extracted out and travel to the vacuum unit via the flexible pipe for disposal.

Advantages of Shot Blasting

Unlike some other preparation methods, captive blasting/shot blasting cleaning, or dustless blasting (as it is sometimes called) is a very fast and cost-effective way to remove existing failed coatings from concrete surfaces.

One of the big plus points in using a captive shot blasting machine to prepare a concrete floor is that by nature it leaves a slightly abraded or textured finish which is ideal to form a key to provide long-lasting adhesion of new coatings or toppings.